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IMO Takes Another Step Forward for Credibility of Methanol Bunkers
by Ship Bunker
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Methanol is compliant with 2020 and provides a pathway to achieving carbon emission targets, says the Methanol Institute.




Ferry Burns and Sinks off Sulawesi
by The Maritime Executive
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

On Friday afternoon, the wooden ferry Fungka Permata V burned and sank off Banggai Laut, a group of islands off Sulawesi, Indonesia. She was carrying about 150 passengers and crewmembers at the time of the sinking.

Response officials received notification of the accident at about 1600 hours, and a rescue vessel arrived on site at 1700 with military servicemembers and police officials on board. They rescued 114 passengers and 12 members of the crew, including 28 individuals who sustained injuries.

According to the most recent count, 13 passengers died in the accident, including two young children. As of Saturday, authorities believed that eight more were still missing. As is common in Southeast Asian ferry operations, the passenger manifest did not reflect the full number of people on board, creating ambiguity about the full impact of the accident. 

The master of the vessel, Andi Sulistiyono, is one of the survivors; tragically, his wife was among the victims, according to Antara News.

[Local news coverage in Indonesian]

The injured and the next of kin have already been provided with compensation by Jasa Raharja, Indonesia's transport insurer. "The [victims' families] received compensation amounting to Rp.50 million ($3,300) . . . and a maximum assistance payment of Rp.20 million ($1,300) for the injured victims," said Jasa Raharja director Budi Raharjo S. in a statement. 

The Permata's crewmembers told authorities that the ferry's engine overheated due to a coolant system failure, sparking the fire. An investigation into cause of the incident continues. 

Another vessel with a similar name, the Fungka Permata III, sank in 2017. She had 14 passengers on her manifest, and all 27 passengers on board were rescued by a passing ship.




Ferry Burns and Sinks off Sulawesi
by The Maritime Executive
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

On Friday afternoon, the wooden ferry Fungka Permata V burned and sank off Banggai Laut, a group of islands off Sulawesi, Indonesia. She was carrying about 150 passengers and crewmembers at the time of the sinking.

Response officials received notification of the accident at about 1600 hours, and a rescue vessel arrived on site at 1700 with military servicemembers and police officials on board. They rescued 114 passengers and 12 members of the crew, including 28 individuals who sustained injuries.

According to the most recent count, 13 passengers died in the accident, including two young children. As of Saturday, authorities believed that eight more were still missing. As is common in Southeast Asian ferry operations, the passenger manifest did not reflect the full number of people on board, creating ambiguity about the full impact of the accident. 

The master of the vessel, Andi Sulistiyono, is one of the survivors; tragically, his wife was among the victims, according to Antara News.

[Local news coverage in Indonesian]

The injured and the next of kin have already been provided with compensation by Jasa Raharja, Indonesia's transport insurer. "The [victims' families] received compensation amounting to Rp.50 million ($3,300) . . . and a maximum assistance payment of Rp.20 million ($1,300) for the injured victims," said Jasa Raharja director Budi Raharjo S. in a statement. 

The Permata's crewmembers told authorities that the ferry's engine overheated due to a coolant system failure, sparking the fire. An investigation into cause of the incident continues. 

Another vessel with a similar name, the Fungka Permata III, sank in 2017. She had 14 passengers on her manifest, and all 27 passengers on board were rescued by a passing ship.




Japan Conducts Submarine Drill in South China Sea
by The Maritime Executive
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Japan has conducted its first peace-time submarine drill in the South China Sea. 

The Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force submarine Kuroshio, commanded by Captain Yasuteru Ueta, along with the helicopter carrier Kaga and two destroyers, Inazuma and Suzutsuki, conducted the drill last Thursday and then made a port call at Vietnam's Cam Ranh Bay earlier this week. It was the first call by a Japanese submarine at the strategically important port since World War II.

In response to the drill, China has urged countries outside the region to behave with caution and refrain from activities that undermine regional peace and stability. "The situation in the South China Sea has cooled down and is improving," said Geng Shuang, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, reports China Daily. "We urge countries outside the region to respect efforts of regional countries in peacefully solving the South China Sea issue through dialogue."

Relations between the two nations are generally seen as positive: Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping next month.

The exercise came after the Royal Navy amphibious transport dock, HMS Albion, conducted a freedom of navigation patrol in waters near the Paracel Islands, claimed by China, Taiwan and Vietnam, in the South China Sea in late August. This patrol prompted a protest from China.

The U.K. and Australia have agreed to strengthen military cooperation, and the new British aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth is expected to be deployed to the Pacific in 2020. She will sail side by side with Australian navy ships. Australia is yet to conduct a freedom of navigation operation in the region, but earlier this month the ABC News reported that China's top military envoy to Australia said it was up to Australia to decide whether to challenge China's claim to the South China Sea, saying freedom of navigation for aircraft and ships has never been a problem in the South China Sea. Earlier this month a Chinese warship was invited to Australia for the first time to take part in the war games Exercise Kakadu.




Japan Conducts Submarine Drill in South China Sea
by The Maritime Executive
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Japan has conducted its first peace-time submarine drill in the South China Sea. 

The Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force submarine Kuroshio, commanded by Captain Yasuteru Ueta, along with the helicopter carrier Kaga and two destroyers, Inazuma and Suzutsuki, conducted the drill last Thursday and then made a port call at Vietnam's Cam Ranh Bay earlier this week. It was the first call by a Japanese submarine at the strategically important port since World War II.

In response to the drill, China has urged countries outside the region to behave with caution and refrain from activities that undermine regional peace and stability. "The situation in the South China Sea has cooled down and is improving," said Geng Shuang, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, reports China Daily. "We urge countries outside the region to respect efforts of regional countries in peacefully solving the South China Sea issue through dialogue."

Relations between the two nations are generally seen as positive: Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping next month.

The exercise came after the Royal Navy amphibious transport dock, HMS Albion, conducted a freedom of navigation patrol in waters near the Paracel Islands, claimed by China, Taiwan and Vietnam, in the South China Sea in late August. This patrol prompted a protest from China.

The U.K. and Australia have agreed to strengthen military cooperation, and the new British aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth is expected to be deployed to the Pacific in 2020. She will sail side by side with Australian navy ships. Australia is yet to conduct a freedom of navigation operation in the region, but earlier this month the ABC News reported that China's top military envoy to Australia said it was up to Australia to decide whether to challenge China's claim to the South China Sea, saying freedom of navigation for aircraft and ships has never been a problem in the South China Sea. Earlier this month a Chinese warship was invited to Australia for the first time to take part in the war games Exercise Kakadu.




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WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2829 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-03-14 04:31:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-03-14 04:31:37 [post_content] =>

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then
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The Tuna Clipper Marine Pier
in San Diego Bay (1980).
Throughout the years, Clipper Oil has grown from a small marine distributor in San Diego to a worldwide supplier of marine fuels and lubricants. Clipper Oil offers a broad diversity of products and services and are active buyers and suppliers of petroleum products. It is this combination that gives us the edge in market intelligence needed to develop the best possible pricing for our clients.

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Clipper Oil supplying the USCG Rush ex.
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