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Israel Moves Closer to Phasing Out Live Imports
by The Maritime Executive
Sunday, July 15, 2018

The controversial live sheep trade has been dealt a fresh blow with the Israeli government giving support to a bill that would phase out the importation of animals from Australia and Europe for slaughter.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whose wife has strongly opposed the live sheep trade and made a personal appeal on the issue to Lucy Turnbull, said on Facebook:

We approved at the Ministerial Committee for Legislation the bill to stop live transports to Israel. It’s our duty to act and correct this enormous suffering caused to animals.

The legislative effort has been led by Knesset member Miki Zohar (Likud party), together with other members from different parties and both sides of politics. A total of 28 members (out of 120) have signed the bill or similar ones.

Zohar said the bill demonstrates the “values” of Israel. He said it would reduce live sheep and cattle transports, while increasing the tax-free import of fresh meat and encouraging local production.

The bill proposes that the importation of live animals for slaughter be phased out gradually. In the first stage, there would be quotas fixed by the agriculture minister. The 2019 quota would not exceed 75 percent of the number of animals imported in 2017. The quota would then be reduced by 25 percent annually, and within three years, live imports would be phased out entirely.

The explanatory note to the bill says:

The animals are imported from Australia and Europe in long sea journeys that could last for weeks. During the journeys the animals are kept in high stocking density, covered in faeces, and suffer from heat stress, from rough seas and from other severe damages.

Many of them get sick and many do not survive the journey.

Scientists and professional committees in Israel and worldwide all share the position that transport of live animals should be avoided when possible, the length of the voyages should be as short as possible and live transport should be substituted with meat trade.

It further states that the amount of fresh meat imported to Israel is expected to rise in the next few years due to tax policy changes.

Australian live sheep exports to Israel are relatively small compared with other key Middle East markets, but the strong stand by the Israeli government is significant, especially given the trade’s current problems. An Israeli phase-out could also impact the commercial viability of continued exports to Jordan, as ships routinely unload animals in both countries.

In 2017, Australia exported 88,000 live sheep to Israel – down from 119,049 the year before – as well as 33,807 cattle. From the start of this year to early June, 30,676 sheep have been exported to the country.

The sheep trade is in hiatus at the moment, with no animals being shipped out after the license of Australia’s biggest exporter, Emanuel Exports, was suspended last month “pending a full review of the company’s response to a show-cause notice” as to why its license should not be canceled.

The Israeli bill was drafted in collaboration with Israeli animal rights groups. Last week, the groups released a survey showing overwhelming public support for the bill.

Sara Netanyahu congratulated the government “for the approval of the humane and moral bill.”

Minister of Public Security Gilad Erdan also welcomed the government’s support for the bill, saying this was “a cause that I have been leading since I served as the minister of the environment. Transporting animals to Israel involves enormous suffering, and we must act to prevent this unnecessary suffering while there is an alternative that causes less pain and suffering to the animals. It’s a moral duty.”

Lyn White from Animals Australia applauded the move, as well:

Israel has always placed great priority on animal welfare, so it is tremendous to see the Netanyahu government respond to community concerns and support an end to live imports.

The strong public support in Israel for an end to live export is reflected here in Australia. We hope that the statements from Israeli politicians highlighting that we have a moral duty to protect animals from suffering will create pause for thought for politicians here.

Liberal backbencher Sussan Ley has a private member’s bill before parliament to phase out the live sheep trade to the Middle East and through the Persian Gulf or Red Sea within five years.

Michelle Grattan is a Professorial Fellow at the University of Canberra, Australia.

Source: The Conversation

 

 




Israel Moves Closer to Phasing Out Live Imports
by The Maritime Executive
Sunday, July 15, 2018

The controversial live sheep trade has been dealt a fresh blow with the Israeli government giving support to a bill that would phase out the importation of animals from Australia and Europe for slaughter.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whose wife has strongly opposed the live sheep trade and made a personal appeal on the issue to Lucy Turnbull, said on Facebook:

We approved at the Ministerial Committee for Legislation the bill to stop live transports to Israel. It’s our duty to act and correct this enormous suffering caused to animals.

The legislative effort has been led by Knesset member Miki Zohar (Likud party), together with other members from different parties and both sides of politics. A total of 28 members (out of 120) have signed the bill or similar ones.

Zohar said the bill demonstrates the “values” of Israel. He said it would reduce live sheep and cattle transports, while increasing the tax-free import of fresh meat and encouraging local production.

The bill proposes that the importation of live animals for slaughter be phased out gradually. In the first stage, there would be quotas fixed by the agriculture minister. The 2019 quota would not exceed 75 percent of the number of animals imported in 2017. The quota would then be reduced by 25 percent annually, and within three years, live imports would be phased out entirely.

The explanatory note to the bill says:

The animals are imported from Australia and Europe in long sea journeys that could last for weeks. During the journeys the animals are kept in high stocking density, covered in faeces, and suffer from heat stress, from rough seas and from other severe damages.

Many of them get sick and many do not survive the journey.

Scientists and professional committees in Israel and worldwide all share the position that transport of live animals should be avoided when possible, the length of the voyages should be as short as possible and live transport should be substituted with meat trade.

It further states that the amount of fresh meat imported to Israel is expected to rise in the next few years due to tax policy changes.

Australian live sheep exports to Israel are relatively small compared with other key Middle East markets, but the strong stand by the Israeli government is significant, especially given the trade’s current problems. An Israeli phase-out could also impact the commercial viability of continued exports to Jordan, as ships routinely unload animals in both countries.

In 2017, Australia exported 88,000 live sheep to Israel – down from 119,049 the year before – as well as 33,807 cattle. From the start of this year to early June, 30,676 sheep have been exported to the country.

The sheep trade is in hiatus at the moment, with no animals being shipped out after the license of Australia’s biggest exporter, Emanuel Exports, was suspended last month “pending a full review of the company’s response to a show-cause notice” as to why its license should not be canceled.

The Israeli bill was drafted in collaboration with Israeli animal rights groups. Last week, the groups released a survey showing overwhelming public support for the bill.

Sara Netanyahu congratulated the government “for the approval of the humane and moral bill.”

Minister of Public Security Gilad Erdan also welcomed the government’s support for the bill, saying this was “a cause that I have been leading since I served as the minister of the environment. Transporting animals to Israel involves enormous suffering, and we must act to prevent this unnecessary suffering while there is an alternative that causes less pain and suffering to the animals. It’s a moral duty.”

Lyn White from Animals Australia applauded the move, as well:

Israel has always placed great priority on animal welfare, so it is tremendous to see the Netanyahu government respond to community concerns and support an end to live imports.

The strong public support in Israel for an end to live export is reflected here in Australia. We hope that the statements from Israeli politicians highlighting that we have a moral duty to protect animals from suffering will create pause for thought for politicians here.

Liberal backbencher Sussan Ley has a private member’s bill before parliament to phase out the live sheep trade to the Middle East and through the Persian Gulf or Red Sea within five years.

Michelle Grattan is a Professorial Fellow at the University of Canberra, Australia.

Source: The Conversation

 

 




Total Buys Engie’s Upstream LNG Business
by The Maritime Executive
Sunday, July 15, 2018

Total has bought Engie’s portfolio of upstream LNG assets for an overall enterprise value of $1.5 billion. Additional payments of up to $ 550 million could be payable by Total in case of an improvement in the oil markets in the coming years.
 
The transaction makes Total the second largest global LNG player among the majors with a worldwide market share of 10 percent, with the group managing an overall LNG portfolio of around 40 Mt per year by 2020. The portfolio includes participating interests in liquefaction plants, notably the interest in the Cameron LNG project in the U.S., long term LNG sales and purchase agreements, an LNG tanker fleet as well as access to regasification capacities in Europe.
 
“Acquiring Engie’s LNG business is a real step change for Total allowing us to leverage size and flexibility in the fast growing and increasingly commoditized LNG market. It also helps us to build a position in the US LNG market, with the 16.6 percent stake in the Cameron LNG project,” commented Patrick Pouyanné, Chairman and CEO of Total.
 
Following the transaction, Total takes over the teams in charge of the upstream LNG activities at Engie.
 
By 2020, Total’s LNG portfolio will consist of:
 
•  A total volume of LNG managed of 40Mt / year.
•  A liquefaction capacity portfolio of 23 MT/year, well distributed among the major LNG production areas: Middle East, Australia, Russia and the United States.
•  A worldwide LNG trading contracts portfolio of 28 MT/year to supply each LNG market with competitive and flexible resources.
•  A role of a key supplier for the European market with regasification capacities of 18 MT/year.
•  A fleet of 18 LNG carriers, of which two are FSRUs.




Total Buys Engie’s Upstream LNG Business
by The Maritime Executive
Sunday, July 15, 2018

Total has bought Engie’s portfolio of upstream LNG assets for an overall enterprise value of $1.5 billion. Additional payments of up to $ 550 million could be payable by Total in case of an improvement in the oil markets in the coming years.
 
The transaction makes Total the second largest global LNG player among the majors with a worldwide market share of 10 percent, with the group managing an overall LNG portfolio of around 40 Mt per year by 2020. The portfolio includes participating interests in liquefaction plants, notably the interest in the Cameron LNG project in the U.S., long term LNG sales and purchase agreements, an LNG tanker fleet as well as access to regasification capacities in Europe.
 
“Acquiring Engie’s LNG business is a real step change for Total allowing us to leverage size and flexibility in the fast growing and increasingly commoditized LNG market. It also helps us to build a position in the US LNG market, with the 16.6 percent stake in the Cameron LNG project,” commented Patrick Pouyanné, Chairman and CEO of Total.
 
Following the transaction, Total takes over the teams in charge of the upstream LNG activities at Engie.
 
By 2020, Total’s LNG portfolio will consist of:
 
•  A total volume of LNG managed of 40Mt / year.
•  A liquefaction capacity portfolio of 23 MT/year, well distributed among the major LNG production areas: Middle East, Australia, Russia and the United States.
•  A worldwide LNG trading contracts portfolio of 28 MT/year to supply each LNG market with competitive and flexible resources.
•  A role of a key supplier for the European market with regasification capacities of 18 MT/year.
•  A fleet of 18 LNG carriers, of which two are FSRUs.




New York Starts Offshore Wind Procurement
by The Maritime Executive
Sunday, July 15, 2018

New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has commenced the state's first round of procurement to support New York's goal of 2,400 megawatts of new offshore wind generation by 2030, enough to power 1.2 million New York households. The state aims to obtain 50 percent of its electricity from renewables by 2030. 
 
The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA) will procure approximately 800 MW of offshore wind through a solicitation issued in the fourth quarter of 2018. Awards are expected to be announced in the second quarter of 2019. If needed, a second solicitation will be issued in 2019. 

Cuomo said. "Robust offshore wind development is not only critical to meeting our clean energy and carbon reduction goals, this investment has the potential to create thousands of jobs and fuel a $6 billion industry for New York as it combats climate change." 

Offshore wind costs have declined significantly in Europe and elsewhere around the world, and NYSERDA estimates that by 2030, New York can attract a $6 billion New York industry that will support nearly 5,000 new jobs in manufacturing, installation and operation of offshore wind facilities. Nearly 2,000 of these jobs would be in operations and maintenance, providing long-term career opportunities. 
  
The New York State Offshore Wind Master Plan was announced earlier this year. The Governor also directed NYSERDA to invest $15 million in clean energy workforce development and infrastructure advancement to train workers to support the growth of the offshore wind industry. In June, NYSERDA was awarded a $18.5 million U.S. Department of Energy grant to lead the National Offshore Wind Research and Development Consortium. This nationwide offshore wind research and development consortium will be supported through a public-private partnership including the offshore wind industry, utilities, research laboratories and other states. 
 




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WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2829 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-03-14 04:31:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-03-14 04:31:37 [post_content] =>

Clipper Oil is a worldwide wholesaler of marine fuels and lubricant oils specializing in supplying vessels throughout the Pacific Ocean. Operating internationally from our headquarters in San Diego, California, USA, we serve the bunkering needs of all sectors of the marine market. This includes fishing fleets, ocean-going yachts, cruise ships, cargo ships, military/government/research vessels, and power plants.

Clipper-Shipyard-SupplyClipper Oil’s predecessor, Tuna Clipper Marine, was founded in 1956 by George Alameda and Lou Brito, two pioneers in the tuna fishing industry. Tuna Clipper Marine’s first supply location was in San Diego, California, USA where they serviced the local fishing fleet.

Established in 1985, Clipper Oil was formed to serve the needs of marine customers in the Western Pacific as vessels shifted their operations from San Diego. Clipper Oil has been a proven supplier of quality marine fuels, lubricants, and services to the maritime community for over 25 years, serving many ports throughout the Pacific Ocean. We maintain warehouses in Pago Pago, American Samoa; Majuro, Marshall Islands; and Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia. We also have operations in the Eastern Pacific in Balboa/Rodman, Panama and Manta, Ecuador. We supply marine vessels and service stations with fuel, lubricant oil, salt, and ammonia. We also supply our customer’s vessels with bunkers at high-seas through various high-seas fuel tankers in all areas of the Pacific Ocean.

then
Then
The Tuna Clipper Marine Pier
in San Diego Bay (1980).
Throughout the years, Clipper Oil has grown from a small marine distributor in San Diego to a worldwide supplier of marine fuels and lubricants. Clipper Oil offers a broad diversity of products and services and are active buyers and suppliers of petroleum products. It is this combination that gives us the edge in market intelligence needed to develop the best possible pricing for our clients.

Our daily monitoring of both the current and future oil market enables our customers to take advantage of market pricing on an immediate basis. This enables Clipper Oil to provide the best current and long term pricing for our customers.

now
Now
Clipper Oil supplying the USCG Rush ex.
pipeline at the fuel dock
in Pago Pago, American Samoa (2013).
Clipper Oil offers the following to our customers:

All of the products we supply meet international specifications and conform to all local regulations.

With our many years of experience in the marine sector, Clipper Oil understands the attention to detail and operational performance vessels require during each port of call.

As a proven reliable and reputable supplier of marine fuel and lubricants, we welcome the opportunity to meet your vessel's needs. Please contact us for all of your marine energy and petroleum needs.

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